PresentationsMarch 22, 2016

Technology Adoption by Baby Boomers (and everybody else)

Innovation and technology go hand in hand in developing the vision and strategy for the business solutions these leaders employ to engage current and new customers (boomers and beyond), and to establish new business models. Lee Rainie and Andrew Perrin present what works and what doesn’t when innovating in large public and nonprofit organizations at the Boomer Summit in Washington.

Multi-section ReportsMarch 10, 2016

Public Predictions for the Future of Workforce Automation

A majority of Americans predict that within 50 years, robots and computers will do much of the work currently done by humans, but few expect their own jobs to experience substantial impacts.

Multi-section ReportsAugust 6, 2014

AI, Robotics, and the Future of Jobs

Experts envision automation and intelligent digital agents permeating vast areas of our work and personal lives by 2025, but they are divided on whether these advances will displace more jobs than they create.

PresentationsNovember 7, 2013

Networked Worlds & Networked Enterprises

Lee Rainie shows how the large, loosely knit social circles of networked individuals expand opportunities for learning, problem solving, decision making, and personal interaction.

PresentationsSeptember 19, 2013

Marketing in the networked age

How the new media ecosystem has affected marketing

PresentationsApril 19, 2013

The State of Digital Marketing in the Networked Age

Pew Internet Director Lee Rainie will discuss the Project’s latest research into internet trends, mobile connectivity, and use of social media and what they mean for marketers.

Multi-section ReportsJuly 5, 2012

The Future of Corporate Responsibility

Corporate responsibility: How far will tech firms go in helping repressive regimes?

Multi-section ReportsNovember 20, 2001

Cities Online: Urban Development and the Internet

This report examines how institutions in five cities (Austin, Texas; Cleveland, Ohio; Nashville, Tennessee; Portland, Oregon and Washington, D.C.) are adapting to the Internet as an economic development and community-building tool. The experiences in these communities suggests that the Internet is best used to encourage bottom-up initiatives, encourage and nurture catalytic individuals in communities, encourage public funding for technology programs, encourage “bridging” among groups, and encourage experimentation.

Multi-section ReportsNovember 14, 2001

The dot-com meltdown and the Web

Some Americans’ Internet experiences are beginning to be affected by the dot-com meltdown, but the vast majority of them are making quick adjustments to get the Web content and services they like without paying extra money

Multi-section ReportsMarch 16, 2001

Risky Business: Americans see greed, cluelessness behind dot-coms’ comeuppance

Most Americans attribute dot-com difficulties to overeager investors looking for quick payoffs and to the poor business plans of dot-com entrepreneurs.