Any corrections made to Pew Internet & American Life Project reports or materials are posted on this web page.

Correction: Due to a programming error at Princeton Survey Research Associates, responses to Q30 of the August-September 2010 health survey were off by 1 percentage point. The corrected results are as follows:

When asked about the last time they had a health issue, 70% 71% of adults in the U.S. say they received information, care, or support from a health professional. Fifty-four Fifty-five percent of adults say they turned to friends and family. Twenty Twenty-one percent of adults say they turned to others who have the same health condition.

The text in both “Peer-to-peer Healthcare” and “The Social Life of Health Information, 2011” has been corrected, as has the published data set.

Correction: There were two data points that were incorrect in “Online Product Research.” The text has been corrected as follows (corrections in strikethrough/bold):

Correction: A table which appears in “Health Topics” originally listed incorrect figures for the percentage of caregivers and non-caregivers who go online. The correct figures were listed in the text of the report. The table has been updated to display the correct figures: 79% of caregivers and 71% of adults who are not caregivers go online.

Correction: “The Future of the Internet IV” originally stated that Nicholas Carr’s article “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” was published in the summer of 2009. It has since been corrected to indicate that the article was published in the summer of 2008.

Correction: “Internet, broadband, and cell phone statistics” originally listed the numbers for internet access by race/ethnicity as 59% for non-Hispanic Blacks and 55% for Hispanics. These have been corrected to 70% for non-Hispanic Blacks and 64% for Hispanics. The numbers for home broadband access by race/ethnicity were originally reported to be 44% for non-Hispanic Blacks and 40% for Hispanics. These have been corrected to 52% for non-Hispanic Blacks and 47% for Hispanics.

Correction: “The State of Music Online: Ten Years After Napster” originally cited an AP article which included an error in the reporting of music industry sales figures. The article originally referenced a decline of 8.5% in total album sales, reported here:http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28463074/ However, the new reference points to the correct rate of decline (14%), as reported here:http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/01/arts/music/01indu.html?_r=1.

Correction: The number of adults who look for health information on a typical day was slightly overstated in the report, Online Health Search 2006. The correct estimate is that 7% of [health seekers], or about [8 million] adults, look for at least one of 17 health topics on a typical day. Previously, the report stated that 7% of [internet users], or about [10 million adults], look for health information on a typical day.

Correction: The December 2004 Pew Internet Project Data Memo titled, Virtual Tours contained the following errors noted in brackets:

Some [60%] of those who have broadband connections at home and [62%] of those who have broadband connections at work have taken virtual tours.
Unlike many other internet activities, virtual tours are not the province of young internet users. Indeed, [52%] of younger Baby Boomers (those age 40-49) have taken virtual tours, compared to just 37% of those in Generation Y (ages 18-27).

The corrected paragraph reads:

Some [65%] of those who have broadband connections at home and [63%] of those who have broadband connections at work have taken virtual tours.
Unlike many other internet activities, virtual tours are not the province of young internet users. Indeed, [51%] of younger Baby Boomers (those age 40-49) have taken virtual tours, compared to just 37% of those in Generation Y (ages 18-27).

Correction: Page 70 of Americas Online Pursuits incorrectly stated that, Online men are [more likely] than online women to have played games online. The corrected sentence reads, Online men and online women are [equally as likely] to have played games online.