November 9, 2011

Teens, kindness and cruelty on social network sites

Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge the assistance and insight from our expert panel: Anne Collier (Net Family News), Marsali Hancock (Internet Keep Safe Coalition), Eden Litt (Northwestern University), Jeff McIntyre (Children Now), Mike Ribble (Digitalcitizenship.org), Jason Rzepka (MTV), Jennifer Oxman Ryan (Harvard University, Good Play Project), Alan Simpson (Common Sense Media), and Julie Walker (American Association of School Librarians). Thanks also to our external reviewers who gave us feedback on the development of the telephone survey and report, and to Jessica Vitak, who helped with proofreading. Also thanks to Eulynn Shiu, who helped immeasurably with the logistics, management, moderation and analysis of our experts meeting and 7 focus groups. And thank you to our focus group and survey participants – we sincerely appreciate you sharing your time and your thoughts with us to make this project possible.

About the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project

The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project is one of seven projects that make up the Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan, nonprofit “fact tank” that provides information on the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. The Project produces reports exploring the impact of the internet on families, communities, work and home, daily life, education, health care, and civic and political life. The Pew Internet Project takes no positions on policy issues related to the internet or other communications technologies. It does not endorse technologies, industry sectors, companies, nonprofit organizations, or individuals.

While we thank our research partners for their helpful guidance, the Pew Internet Project had full control over the design, implementation, analysis and writing of this survey. The presentation of these findings, as well as any omissions or errors, is the authors’ responsibility alone.

About Cable in the Classroom

Cable in the Classroom (CIC), the national education foundation of the U.S. cable industry, advocates for digital citizenship and the visionary, sensible, and effective use of cable’s broadband technology, services, and content in teaching and learning. Since 1989, CIC has also supported the complimentary provision, by cable companies and programmers, of broadband and multichannel video services and educational content to the nation’s schools. For more information, visit www.ciconline.org.

About the Family Online Safety Institute

The Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI) works to make the online world safer for kids and their families by identifying and promoting best practices, tools and methods that also respect free speech. FOSI is a trusted, international convener, bringing together leaders in government, industry and the nonprofit sectors to collaborate and innovate new solutions in child safety in a Web 2.0 world. FOSI’s members include: AOL, AT&T, BT Retail, Comcast, Disney, Entertainment Software Association, Facebook, France Telecom, Google, GSM Association, Microsoft, Motion Picture Association of America, NCTA, Nominum, Optenet, RuleSpace, Sprint, StreamShield, Symantec, Time Warner Cable, Telefónica, TELMEX, USTelecom, The Wireless Foundation, Verizon and Yahoo!. For more information, visit www.fosi.org.

Cite this publication: Amanda Lenhart, Mary Madden, Aaron Smith, Kristen Purcell, Kathryn Zickuhr and Lee Rainie. “Teens, kindness and cruelty on social network sites.” Pew Research Center, Washington, D.C. (November 9, 2011) http://www.pewinternet.org/2011/11/09/teens-kindness-and-cruelty-on-social-network-sites/, accessed on July 23, 2014.