June 16, 2011

Social networking sites and our lives

Acknowledgements

About

We are grateful to Evans Witt (Princeton Survey Research Associates International), who assisted in the administration of the project survey. We would also like to thank Brett Bumgarner (University of Pennsylvania), Shelia Cotton (University of Alabama – Birmingham), Nora Draper (University of Pennsylvania), Amy Gonzales (University of Pennsylvania), Ermitte St. Jacques (University of Pennsylvania), Chul-Joo Lee (The Ohio State University), Cameron Marlow (Facebook), Matthew Salganik (Princeton University), and Tyler McCormick and Tian Zheng (both at Columbia University) for their advice at various stages of this work.

The Pew Internet & American Life Project is an initiative of the Pew Research Center, a nonprofit “fact tank” that provides information on the issues, attitudes, and trends shaping America and the world. The Pew Internet Project explores the impact of the internet on children, families, communities, the work place, schools, health care and civic/political life.  The Project is nonpartisan and takes no position on policy issues. Support for the Project is provided by The Pew Charitable Trusts. More information is available at pewinternet.org

Keith N. Hampton is an assistant professor in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in sociology from the University of Toronto, and a B.A. in sociology from the University of Calgary. His research interests focus on the relationship between new information and communication technologies, social networks, and the urban environment. More information on his research can be found at www.mysocialnetwork.net. He can be followed on Twitter at www.twitter.com/mysocnet.

Lauren Sessions Goulet is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. She received an M.A. in Communication from the University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. in Sociology from Tufts University. Her current research interests focus on the relationship between geography, use of social networking sites, and social support.